Xilinx qspi example

There are 3 subprojects in there That file include the header "xqspips. That last file does have some "qspi" mentions in it. Now I'm not sure what the correct thing to use is. Could you illuminate that a bit? Thanks in advance. Best Regards, Srikanth Kindly note- Please mark the Answer as "Accept as solution" if information provided is helpful.

View solution in original post. Thanks, this seems to fit the xspi header in my project. Not the same flash, but I guess I will take parts from the ISSI flash driver that uses the other library to turn the winbond example to something more fitting.

ZYNQ Training - Session 05 - Designing AXI Sub-systems Using Xilinx Vivado - Part II

The result seems wrong, but that could have a lot of causes. And now with debugging enabled for the BSP, I see it hangs here:. So it seems it is expecting to be something happening with regards to an interrupt. Althouth this loop is in the code branch which a comment describes as: "Polled mode of operation", and the branch above that, it's called "Interrupt Mode of operation".

Why is it querying interrupt related flags there at least that's what their names and comments above the defines suggest?

Here is my modified winbond flash example, with the intent to make it polling mode:. Sign In Help.

xilinx qspi example

Turn on suggestions. Auto-suggest helps you quickly narrow down your search results by suggesting possible matches as you type. Showing results for. Search instead for. Did you mean:. All forum topics Previous Topic Next Topic. Accepted Solutions. Give Kudos to a post which you think is helpful and reply oriented. Now I have still some configuration problem, apparently.For this tutorial I am using Vivado This will bring up the IP configuration window.

Wire them up to the corresponding pin on the SPI controller. Note: there will be many unused pins, since the controller can be used as a master, slave, or both. To do this, instantiate a constant IP module and set the value to 1.

My block design is shown below:. Note that I have also marked the pins for debug. This can be really useful for debugging your software using the embedded logic analyzer feature of Vivado.

Generate a bitstream and export your design to SDK. You need to create a PetaLinux project and extract the hardware description from your project SDK directory as discussed in tutorial Before you build PetaLinux, though, you need to modify the device tree to create the appropriate device file for your SPI device. Then you need to enable SPI support for your kernel.

To configure the kernel run the following command. Now you can run petalinux-build and petalinux-package to build and package Linux. Then copy the program to your board using ssh. Run the command, and if you use the embedded logic analyzer, you should see activity on the SPI interface.

xilinx qspi example

Will the block design in vivado be the same as given in this tutorial? How can i get my fpga to control the LMXevm? The constraints and PS configuration will differ depending on how you are connecting the device to the board. How can I get hold of a copy of system-top.

I tried to see your.

AXI Quad SPI

I have a. The dts file is really Linux specific. You can use the techniques described in tutorial 24 to bit-bang the SPI interface. If you only need low-speed control of a SPI device this can often be the simplest solution. Of course, sometimes it is just easier to read the spec on the SPI IP block and just program the registers.

I am using Linux, Xilinx Pulsar Linux in particular. Now I just need some insight into the MIO mapping syntax in the. Thanks for these helpful tutorial.You can refer to the below stated example applications for more details on how to use spi driver.

Contains an example on how to use the XSpi driver directly. This example performs the basic selftest using the driver. This example erases the Page, writes to the Page, reads back from the Page and compares the data.

This example erases a sector, writes to a Page within the sector, reads back from that Page and compares the data. This example shows the usage of the Spi driver and the Spi device using the interrupt mode. This example shows the usage of the low-level driver of the SPI driver. A simple loopback test is done within an SPI device in polled mode.

This example works only with 8-bit wide data transfers. This example erases a Sector, writes to a Page within the Sector, reads back from that Page and compares the data. This example shows the usage of the Spi driver and the Spi device using the polled mode.

This example shows the usage of the Spi driver and the Spi device as a Slave, in interrupt mode. This example shows the usage of the Spi driver and the Spi device as a Slave, in polled mode.

All rights reserved.I need to verify the hardware of a prototype board before the revised version is sent to production, and I am having trouble with verifying the QSPI flash, which would absolutely be necessary due to the lack of DDR on the board.

I understand your SW options are limited.

Tutorial 26: Controlling a SPI device using the ZYNQ SPI controller

You have to weigh the decision to move on versus the difficulties you'll encounter if you wait to gain more confidence. I'm not a SW guy heck, a SW guy probably would scratch his head A boot image set as x4 will lead to a x4 read-back during a boot. View solution in original post. But you probably don't want to boot from a 1x SPI device.

You'll need to show that the device can operate in QSPI x4 mode. The canned code might be a destructive test, so it would preserve a sector in DDR before testing it. Without DDR for buffering, that code wouldn't work.

This could be the Forum post you're looking for. You can also look at AR I think I'll stop trying to figure the drivers out and go for the boot from QSPI flash approach to verify the hardware. I was wondering though. I think an updated AR or application note would be great, although I realize that the Zynqs are quickly becoming legacy to the new UltraScales which apparently do have better native support for DDR-less designs.

I then compiled the FSBL, made a hello world test application and compiled that. Next, a boot image was created with the FSBL. I then attempted to flash the boot image file using the same FSBL. I also checked the boxes for blank check after erase and verify after flash. Now the flash operation was apparently successful, although I'm still unable to see anything happen on the device's UARTs from the helloworld application that I bundled with the FSBL in the boot-image.

However, I left all of the linkerscripts in their default configuration, so I probably have some overlapping memory issues. Nonetheless, the point of this was to figure out if my QSPI hardware actually works or not, and the fact that I am able to detect, erase, write and verify the content should confirm that right?

I think you're on the right track. If it were me, I'd like to see the code behave as expected - so I would enable the debug messaging in the FSBL and make sure all code is linking to where it should and verify expected output to the UART. And you're being pressed to approve the prototype design?

Something's not right about that. I appreciate the concern, perhaps I overstated my situation slightly. We are a student organization Fun fact; we are actually sponsored by Xilinx! We spend 8 months on building an electric race-car from scratch, including everything from carbon fiber rims to all the electronics.

The hardware before software thing sure is not a great solution, it just happens that every other PCB is slightlly revised from the previous year's version for which a code base already exists.

I'm completely switching platform here, and I'm the only one who has the slightest idea of this system, both in terms of hardware and software, but I still have to follow the project plan as everyone else. If everything fails, there should be enough time to do another production run cleaning up the last few problems. The Spansion part's pin-out really didn't play out well with the Zynq's, and had to be mounted on the backside.

I figured keeping the QSPI flash on the same side as the Zynq-device and routing everything in the top-layer would reduce trace-impedance significantly by avoiding vias.

Also, way smaller footprint which is nice. Flashing still works as well as it did with the Spansion part, although it is recognized as it's predecessor. Memory-maps and all are apparently the same, so it should be fine, and it's also a supported part.It runs in interrupt mode. This example runs in single mode.

CR 1. This API enables Quad mode for the flash parts which require to enable quad mode before using Quad commands. As per the Micron and ISSI spec, before issuing the command to enter into 4 byte addr mode, a write enable command is issued. For Macronix and Winbond flash parts write enable is not required. All the data put into the buffer must be in the same page of the device with page boundaries being on byte boundaries.

The purpose of this function is to illustrate how to use the XQspiPsu device driver in single, parallel and stacked modes using flash devices greater than or equal to Mb. This functions performs a bulk erase operation when the flash device has a single die. Note None. This functions performs a die erase operation on all the die in the flash device. This API enters the flash device into 4 bytes addressing mode. Enable is a either 1 or 0 if 1 then enters 4 byte if 0 exits. Address contains the address of the first sector which needs to be erased.

ByteCount contains the total size to be erased. This function performs a read. Default setting is in DMA mode. Command is the command used to read data from the flash. Supports normal, fast, dual and quad read commands. Parameters None. Address contains the address to write data to in the Flash. ByteCount contains the number of bytes to write.

Command is the command used to write data to the flash. This functions translates the address based on the type of interconnection. In case of stacked, this function asserts the corresponding slave select. Address which is to be accessed for erase, write or read Returns RealAddr is the translated address - for single it is unchanged; for stacked, the lower flash size is subtracted; for parallel the address is divided by 2.

Note In addition to get the actual address to work on flash this function also selects the CS and BUS based on the configuration detected. Callback handler. Returns None Note None. RecvBufPtr is a pointer to a buffer for received data.

xilinx qspi example

Address is the starting address within the flash from from where data needs to be read. ByteCount contains the number of bytes to receive. All rights reserved.This examples performs some transfers in Auto mode and Manual start mode, to illustrate the modes available.

This example illustrates single, parallel and stacked modes. Both the flash devices have to be of the same make and size. Referenced by FlashErase. It then deduces the make and size of the flash and obtains the connection mode to point to corresponding parameters in the flash configuration table. The flash driver will function based on this and it presently supports Micron and Spansion -and Mbit and Winbond Mbit. All the data put into the buffer must be in the same page of the device with page boundaries being on byte boundaries.

References QspiGFlashExample. The purpose of this function is to illustrate how to use the XQspiPs device driver in single, parallel and stacked modes using flash devices greater than Mb. Referenced by main. Functions Variables. This functions performs a bulk erase operation when the flash device has a single die. This functions performs a die erase operation on all the die in the flash device. Address contains the address of the first sector which needs to be erased.

ByteCount contains the total size to be erased. Pointer to the write buffer which is to be transmitted Returns None. Note None. Command is the command used to read data from the flash. Supports normal, fast, dual and quad read commands. Pointer to the write buffer which contains data to be transmitted Pointer to the read buffer to which valid received data should be written Returns none.

Address contains the address to write data to in the Flash. ByteCount contains the number of bytes to write. Command is the command used to write data to the flash. This functions translates the address based on the type of interconnection. In case of stacked, this function asserts the corresponding slave select. Address which is to be accessed for erase, write or read Returns RealAddr is the translated address - for single it is unchanged; for stacked, the lower flash size is subtracted; for parallel the address is divided by 2.

Parameters None. This functions selects the current bank. Pointer to the write buffer which contains data to be transmitted BankSel is the bank to be selected in the flash device s. Flash Config Table. All rights reserved.The example writes to flash and reads it back in DMA mode.

xilinx qspi example

It runs in interrupt mode. This example works only with single mode and x1 or x2 data mode. This example will not work with x4 data mode and dual parallel or stacked configuration. PR 1. CR 1. This API enables Quad mode for the flash parts which require to enable quad mode before using Quad commands. As per the Micron and ISSI spec, before issuing the command to enter into 4 byte addr mode, a write enable command is issued.

For Macronix and Winbond flash parts write enable is not required. All the data put into the buffer must be in the same page of the device with page boundaries being on byte boundaries. Referenced by main. Note None. This functions performs a bulk erase operation when the flash device has a single die. This functions performs a die erase operation on all the die in the flash device. This API enters the flash device into 4 bytes addressing mode. Enable is a either 1 or 0 if 1 then enters 4 byte if 0 exits.

Address contains the address of the first sector which needs to be erased. ByteCount contains the total size to be erased. This function performs a read. Default setting is in DMA mode. Command is the command used to read data from the flash. Supports normal, fast, dual and quad read commands.